15 comments on “Unobtanium “in the crate” zero miles 1977 CA77 $150,000 (starting bid) $250,000 (Buy it Now) Honda 305 Dream!

  1. Pingback: Dan Maxey, who started polishing… | Helmet Hair Motorcycle News

  2. I love these greedy idiots that find this stuff and think they won the lottery. You’re not going to retire off some old Honda you found in a box. I can’t think of any Honda that would fetch that kind of money, and this is a 305 Dream were talking about, they sell for like $3k mint. You might make a deal with someone if you had a first year Superhawk and you took a zero off that asking price. Otherwise go pound sand you clown.

  3. You know Zach it only takes one. And you’ll never know if you don’t ask. Try reading the article too:

    “Dan Maxey, who started polishing motorcycles for his dad at about 9 years old and now owns the business, said their plan was to give away the Dream at an open house, or an anniversary celebration.”

    • Sorry Steve, I didn’t read the article before hand, but after reading the story I’m still of the opinion that greed was the motivation for such a exorbitant asking price.

      “Dan Maxey, who started polishing motorcycles for his dad at about 9 years old and now owns the business, said their plan was to give away the Dream at an open house, or an anniversary celebration.
      It never happened.
      Jim Maxey died in 2005, leaving the fate of the motorcycle in Dan Maxey’s hands. He’s passing it on, too, to his son, Tony Maxey, sales manager for Maxey’s Cycles.”

      So the man’s son wanted to give the bike away but the grandson thinks he can make a quarter of a million dollars off of it. It’s amazing sometimes how the values of a family can change over a few generations.

  4. I’ve got no use for a crate, or a ’67 Honda, but I sure could use the money. I am sure someone would buy it.

  5. Not a bike that appeals to me in itself. If rarity is the only value, I would rather sell it and pay off school debt, or however far that would go. I’d put that money into something that I could ride every day without worry. For rare historical stuff, you have a lot of expense and risk. I would only sink that kind of concern into something I was really passionate about. I would be more exited about many bikes that are less rare.

  6. “it’s only worth is what the last bid is .” Harold LeMay . I actually like it left in the crate. Kinda like the road never taken.

  7. I just noticed: “Buyer responsible for vehicle pick-up or shipping.”!! for 150K you think they could throw in the shipping LOL…

  8. when classic cars are selling in the hundreds of thousands, to multi millions, a few hundred thousand for a motorcycle thats the only one of its kind isn’t that far fetched at somepoint, now or in the near future.

  9. I remember well the Honda CA 77 305 Dreams when I bought my first motorcycle. The Dreams were collecting dust, and I never cared for the looks of that motorcycle. I knew a man who had a Honda 305 Dream and he said I could have it for free. I told him I was not interested in owning it. It also came with a title, but that didn’t mean anything to me. I myself would rather have a Vincent Black Shadow Series C in restored condition that wouldn’t cost as much as that Honda Dream in the crate.

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